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Passing Through Aramingo Avenue

Passing Through Aramingo Avenue

Take the Scenic Route: On this Aramingo Avenue auto body shop, classic signage is restored and reinvented. This building looks as it did fifty years ago, or does it?

Design: Meg Saligman, Juan Dimida


Passing Through Columbus Boulevard

Passing Through Columbus Boulevard

Cheese Whizz Peace: Passing Through changes your expectations about what you are supposed to see at this abandoned hoagie shack. You could pass this site 20 times and finally stop to wonder. Is this a mural?

Design: Meg Saligman


Passing Through Delaware Avenue

Passing Through Delaware Avenue

Pumping Gas: Abandoned gas pumps are made new with text collected from flyers found around the site.

Design: Juan Dimida


Passing Through Fairhill

Passing Through Fairhill

Look/Listen: Two generations speak to one another across an intersection. A team of 16 Philadelphia youth designed and painted this bilingual mural.

Design: Mural Corps youth, James Burns, Meg Saligman


Passing Through I-76

Passing Through I-76

Mile 342 9/10: Figures flying over the city burst forth from signs pointing to Central Philly. Fabric and pieces of the road flow and swirl in the breeze. Text from all satellite sites shimmers in the background.

Design: Meg Saligman


Passing Through Italian Market

Passing Through Italian Market

Lookie Loo: This delivery truck is often out passing through the city, but its home base is the Italian Market in South Philadelphia. We all have a link to the oft-repeated phrase four generations, made up of a grandparent, a parent, a child and a grandchild.

Design: Meg Saligman, Sue Spolan


Passing Through Kensington

Passing Through Kensington

Cock-A-Doodle-Doo: Inspired by nearby wall writing, car words on an auto body shop catch the eye with stylized fonts and bright colors. Massive roosters represent eavesdropped sound of the birds crowing at the site.

Design: Juan Dimida


Passing Through Northern Liberties

Passing Through Northern Liberties

Mom Home Cash: The inspiration for this satellite site came from pages of collected text. During the eavesdropping process, we've gathered thousands of words from all over Philadelphia. We found that the three most frequently heard words are Mom, Home and Cash. We all think of these words one, two, three or four times a day. And when we are in our cars listening to the traffic report, we hear the phrase "two three four times a day." It is the commuter's mantra.

Design: Juan Dimida


Passing Through Port Richmond

Passing Through Port Richmond

We Will Never Forget You: Images of a grandfather, a daughter and grandson adorn the windows of this historic Port Richmond factory building as the words of the grandfather, a war veteran and businessman, scroll across the top.

Design: Meg Saligman, Sue Spolan, Juan Dimida


Passing Through Queen Village

Passing Through Queen Village

These Are All in Jars: This pedestrian scale site features the words of the ancient Essene philosophers combined with the words of customers inside this whole foods store. Which text is contemporary and which is ancient?

Design: Jon Crowell


Passing Through Rittenhouse Square

Passing Through Rittenhouse Square

A Neurologist and a Shrink: Text collected from people going to and returning from nearby theatrical events adorns a parking lot doorway.

Design: Meg Saligman, Sue Spolan


Passing Through Scrim

Passing Through Scrim

Banner: This site-on-a-site is part of the text on textile theme of Passing Through. The scrim hangs in front of the main Passing Through mural on I-76 at the Girard Avenue bridge.

Design: Meg Saligman


Passing Through South Street

Passing Through South Street

Sabot: The definition of sabot, a wooden shoe, is the heart of this mural painted on the face of an anarchist bookstore. The text was taken from printed material inside the store.

Design: Daniel Nelson and Andria Bibiloni


Passing Through Southwest

Passing Through Southwest

4950: One peers through a fisheye lens at neighborhood youth writing with sidewalk chalk. This mural pays tribute to the ageless urge to create written symbols.

Design: EE Yates